Monday, December 28, 2009

Harold Burnham featured in December 28th Boston Globe

Harold was interviewed by the Boston Globe recently and the story appeared on the front page of the Dec. 28 issue today. The story was written by veteran Globe reporter David Filipov and is called Masters keep Antique Presses Printing, Indian Drums Beating and the gist of the story is about Massachusetts artisans who have received special grants to pursue and preserve their craft. Harold was a grant recipient in 2006. The quote Harold gave the Globe is worth reading and the overall story is great.
The link is posted here - http://www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/articles/2009/12/28/masters_keep_knowledge_of_crafts_alive_with_support_from_state/









http://www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/articles/2009/12/28/masters_keep_knowledge_of_crafts_alive_with_support_from_state/

Wednesday, December 23, 2009

Thursday, December 17, 2009

Putting the canvas covers on the sloops




Getting boats covered here at Burnham Boatbuilding is an important part of the winterization process. Harold is pictured here covering the Dream and the Maria with canvas cloth.  All the boats in the yard have canvas covers which is more attractive and sounds a lot different than plastic or shrink wrap when old man winter hits.  On the bottom left, is Harold's Dad, Charles standing on the dock a few weeks ago and on the right is Harold getting the cover on.

Wednesday, December 2, 2009

Splitting a log for a wooden schooner




These photos are somewhat out of sequence but yesterday Harold tackled a massive white oak log that he wanted to cut and use for frame futtocks. The oak had a natural crux that is great for frame futtocks as it is so much stronger as the grain will follow the frame. It is not easy to get a log with that much curve in it from a regular sawyer. So, Harold was particularly pleased with its curved lines. It took a total of about 45 minutes to get the log on the sawmill for cutting. Harold first used his chainsaw but then use a sledgehammer and wedges for quite a while. All the while, the wood was making its own special crackling and squeaking sounds. Finally, it split and he had it on the sawmill. Thank you Eric, for some extra muscle!